Tagged - spam spam spam eggs sausage and spam

Happy Anniversary CASL, you constitutional law, you!

The “Inception” of spam emails. Click to embiggen it’s a fun read.

Happy Canada Day, eh? Not only is it Canada Day, it is the 6th anniversary of the coming into force of Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL), the law that ended spam forever. Well except for the spam I screen-shotted above from yesterday that is freaking me out man, in the way it is turning a mirror on me and my little website’s 7-year-old posts and internet privacy. So what do you get a law that has everything? How about a decision from the Federal Court of Appeal that says you pass constitutional muster? Done and done, and it even came 3 weeks early. OK it’s not Friday afternoon anymore, so let’s read this fucking 250-paragraph thing already.

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Posted in: The Courts
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Clearly Unconstitutional Anti-Spam Law Declared Constitutional

Clearly free expression

I’ve got some catching up to do in my posts. I’m on fire now! Three in two weeks! (-ish).

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Posted in: Regulatory regime in Canada, Uncategorized
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CASL news! The crusade against spam continues unabated

spammmmmmm

Wow! Exciting developments on Canada’s anti-spam front, especially in the last week. Undoubtedly the spammers are quaking in their boots.

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Posted in: Internet law basics, Regulatory regime in Canada
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All malware in Canada disappears today! w00t!!!!!

mbam-antimalware-goI could not let today pass without commemorating this historic occasion. As of today, thanks to our government’s efforts, malware, and indeed all unwanted software, is disappearing forever. All hail the glory!

As you know because you read this blog diligently, today is the day that the computer software provisions of CASL (the Anti-Spam Law) come into force. I already explained all this late last year, so I will not do it again. I will remind you that section 8 and related provisions of CASL that are in force as of today are designed to eliminate malware and indeed, all unwanted software and software updates and upgrades from your computers and devices. No doubt the government’s sledgehammer approach is working, and we can say goodbye to malware forever.

The people of Canada never thought it would be possible for the government to abolish malware and other unwanted software. However, they managed it and all Canadian businesses and digital users are over the moon. For the rest of the world, there are still many countries impacted by malware and other viruses that can cause big problems for businesses. Many companies still have to ensure their devices have been protected against unwanted malware by using the services offered by https://www.fleetsmith.com/, and other companies similar. By doing that, companies feel more secure when using their devices and handling client data. Hopefully, other countries will follow in Canada’s footsteps soon.

I would type more, but this weird pop-up box keeps showing up on my screen every time I hit enter. Maybe this Ask.com toolbar will have some answers as to how to fix that. Where did that come from?

Posted in: Internet law basics
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The Anti-Spam Law isn’t just about spam – let’s install some computer programs

Floppy_disk_2009_G1Oh sure, we’ve written about how stupid CASL (Canada’s Anti-Spam Law) is around here many times. Basically because it’s stupid. But we’ve always focused on the actual spam parts of the law. However coming very soon, another part of the law is going to come into effect. And finally, last week the CRTC provided some guidelines on the subject. So we better take a look at this business about installing computer programs. Is it as stupid as the spam parts? We’ll see! Maybe you would like to consider computer repairs after reading this article then you may want to consider Steve’s computer repair service, it is always important to make sure that you do have a working healthy computer when installing computer programs to make sure that you do not get any viruses.

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Posted in: Internet law basics, Regulatory regime in Canada
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Happy Anti-Spam Day!

spammmmmmm

Sure, it’s Canada Day, but well, this is much more important. CASL is in effect as of today! Yay! Booooooo. I have absolutely no desire to write about this stupid fucking law again, so go read the archives. I might also suggest this excellent substantive FAQ from Barry Sookman he posted yesterday.

I am pleased to report that in all seven of my email accounts, I have yet to receive a single piece of spam today! Well done, government! It works! Oh wait, here’s one. Larger penis, eh? Ooh look, some pharmacy-grade viagra to go with it! Well that was fun while it lasted.

Posted in: Commentary
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SPAM SPAM SPAM Eggs Bacon and SPAM

Here are the slides of a presentation I gave this morning for the Plank Breakfast Club, an amazing new series happening at the awesome company where I spent five years, Plank. My audience was enraptured as I regaled them with how their organizations are screwed under Canada’s Anti-Spam Law. I was enraptured by some very good questions:

pensive

(pic courtesy of @iamflb, used without permission, probably)

Posted in: Internet law basics, Regulatory regime in Canada
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All spam in Canada to disappear July 1, 2014

spammmmmmm

Last Wednesday, the government announced that Bill C-28, aka Canada’s Anti-Spam law, aka CASL, aka “An Act to promote the efficiency and adaptability of the Canadian economy by regulating certain activities that discourage reliance on electronic means of carrying out commercial activities, and to amend the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Act, the Competition Act, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act and the Telecommunications Act” (no really that’s its official title, click the link) will come into force July 1, 2014, thus putting an end to spam in Canada forever. Or something like that.

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Posted in: Internet law basics, Regulatory regime in Canada
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